I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

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I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Cannon_Fodda on Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:47 pm

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I was laying in bed with the hangover from hell, and I could hear steam train whistles, I knew there was a museum nearby, didn't realise they had working engine displays though.

Anyway, I went for a look, and took some pics.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanjc/set ... 496240971/

Edit: OK all re-uploaded as full size images now.
Fuck the revolution.

Re: I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Monie on Thu Jul 16, 2009 7:11 pm

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I meant to reply to this earlier but forgot about it!

Imo some of those would look awesome Black+White/Sepia - You use Lightroom? If you do fire through some of the inbuilt presets to see what they look like done up like that.

Without having a play myself my gut tells me these ones specifically would look amazing like that:
Image
Image
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Also just a general thing i noticed was that some of them were overexposed with the sky especially being very washed out on occasions - that's something Lightroom could also largely fix up pretty easily but it's worth thinking about in future assuming you weren't on the auto mode in the camera - and if you were then it's worth remembering that the camera's auto seems to overexpose sky! :p

Re: I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Cannon_Fodda on Thu Jul 30, 2009 1:15 pm

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I have Aperture, as Lightroom seemed like total overkill for my requirements & skill, but I will give it a go :)

As for the exposure, it was really cloudy on one half, and sunny on the other, I was just controlling exposure with the shutter speed, I still need to get to grips with the other settings, and I have no HDR setting, just manual bracketing. I honestly have no clue about how any of the options other than Auto and shutter speeds work, so am still learning :)
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Re: I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Tonster on Thu Jul 30, 2009 4:57 pm

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Read the manual. Serious point, not a dig, I read mine through several times when I was getting to grips with exposure lengths, shutter speeds etc and it helped immensely :)

If you want to learn proper like, don't use auto :P Use the creative modes, Tv and Av are the ones I use most, and full manual to really learn the trade. In Tv mode (time value) you set the shutter speed and the camera handles the aperture, adjusting it to balance the light to 'normal'. In Av mode (Aperture value) you control the aperture and the camera automatically adjusts the speed.

In general use Tv when you're shooting a moving object (so you can ensure you have a fast enough speed set to avoid blur), and Av when it's reasonably still (to adjust the depth of field... smaller number = more background blur).

One very good reason not to shoot in auto mode - it will only capture JPEGs and not RAW. You really want to shoot RAW files, they can hold a greater range of light which might have enabled you to rescue the sky details from your images. RAW mode has saved my photos on numerous occasions thanks to all the extra detail it saves.

TBH from what I see above you had little option with the sky, the dynamic range is too great for the camera to capture it all. If you'd got sky detail you'd have a really dark train. Bracketing (+ tripod) would have helped as you could merge the shots (not HDR, I mean cut and paste the sky), and RAW + Lightroom might have been able to recover some detail. That wouldn't work if any of them were moving, and steam adds problems to compositing images.

Anyway, I think they're perfectly good shots :P





It's also really helpful to understand how your camera measures 'normal/average' light, that will help you to understand what object to meter the light from in a high contrast shot.

In short your camera assumes that whatever it is pointing at is 18% grey, which works pretty well in most instances. However if you take a shot of snow for example it will assume that's 18% grey and so it will come out grey (under exposed). Take a photo of coal and you'll get a large over exposure as your camera tries to lighten it to 18% grey. As such when metering a scene - pick something that's a light grey (or would be if it were greyscale) meter off that, lock the exposure, then reframe and shoot.

Re: I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Cacker on Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:09 am

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yep, basics are quite important, it will change the way you take photographs.

One thing i miss from the 'old' days, is that the old lenses used to portray depth of field. Given an aperture setting, you could see from the lense that everything between 3m and 10m was going to be in focus. I got into the habit of hardly ever focusing on the subject, I just work with the dept of field range. I remember wanting to get, was it the FM2 ? because it had a depth of field preview. You pressed q button to bring in the aperture to its setting and through the view finder you could actually see what was in focus, kinda wysiwig depth of field.

perhaps more expensive digi cameras do it ? aha, bum, so they do rinky dink.

However, it's strange that, i took my best photographs when i knew the least :P I think I worry too much these days on each shot and perhaps expect more.

important thing is learn your camera's abilities inside out. utilise it's features. It is handy to look at the manual, because some things you'll want to do, but don't know how -> manual -> huzzah ! but some things you can't know what you don't know ... so you might read the manual and go .. hey ... that would be useful for ... huzzah !!

I found it was good to go through the manual piece meal and actually use those functions and realise what they'd be useful for.

Unless I'm shooting something specific, like fast motion, or doing slow exposures, aperture priority tends to be my default.

And YES ... the whole metering business and the x% grey card used by cameras is probably very useful to know and explains why snow shots come out pants (without any forethought). Unfortunately, cameras don't have the wonderful thing called the human eye that has huge abilities to compensate in terms of colour and exposure. Cameras need over exposure/under exposure compensation and also colour temperature considerations when indoors, outdoors, under fluorescant lighting (which can be pink or green).

This is where I think matrix metering systems fall down, they make the same presumption on every shot, but on every shot YOU have different ideas on what exposure level you'd like. I tend to normal use spot metering and get a reading from what *I* deem to be the correct exposure reference point. Aperture locks are very useful for this.
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Re: I went to Tyseley Locomotive Works today for an open day

Postby Klors on Fri Jul 31, 2009 6:28 pm

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Cannon_Fodda wrote:I have Aperture, as Lightroom seemed like total overkill for my requirements & skill, but I will give it a go :)

If you've already got Aperture, Lightroom won't buy you enough extra to really be worth splashing the cash. Just watching a few good "How to use Aperture" kinda vids online would probably be the best way forwards.

One thing is that on my camera Auto can only take JPGs, don't know if your's is the same, but if the originals are jpg, you're going to only have limited tweaking capabilities anyway. RAW is daddy if you can.
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